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Okay, so, basically, I wrote myself into a corner, and now I need to write myself out of it.

See, I didn’t set this series up right.  What I intended to do was simply introduce the despair topic and use it to more or less smoothly transition into just-plain-coaching.  Remember?  I said that I had met a few despairing teams, and that they changed my approach to coaching.

But then, I kinda got confused and made it seem like there was a whole lot more to say about dealing with despair. And there is, I suppose, but I don’t want folks to get confused about this:

There Are No Special Secrets For Despair

Coaching a team that is paralyzed is just like coaching any team that uses either old-school methods or no method at all. I rely on the same pillars, use the same coaching practices, and apply them in the same order. I did not start out that way.  I was always looking for a killer anti-despair-otic formula. I don’t know if I have one now or not, but I do know I work the same regardless of despair.  with the exception of special attention to the items in Part 2.

That having been said, there are a few places where a despairing team may need that extra little push. As we go into my coaching pillars and practices, I will call them out clearly.

(By the way, did you see that? I just made a mistake in front of God and everybody, and then faintly laughed at it, and then changed direction.  Always remember Giselle and Gandhi.)

So, It Turns Out Coaching Coaches Is My Thing

Going forward, I’m going to drop “Coaching:” from my titles.  I’ll still do the geek stuff, like DoubleDawgDare, of course, because coaches need to know these things, but the main thrust now is directly about coaching.  The word “Coaching:” in our titles is now unnecessary duplication, and we shall refactor it accordingly.

One Response to “Coaching: Attacking Despair (Oops)”

  1. rubytester says:

    I like the idea of antidespairant, a type of antperspirant. You need that odor reducing thing that makes you keep going and does not paralyze the people who work with you.

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